Burnside: It’s All About the Lifestyle

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Grounded in the surf/skate culture, Burnside designs classic apparel with the latest fashion trends in mind to reflect an easy-going and dynamic lifestyle. From authentic board shorts, to flannels, t-shirts, fleece and outerwear, Burnside clothing suits both the active surf/skate enthusiast and those who just want to live easy in comfortable clothing. For nearly 20 years they’ve been providing consumers with practical and contemporary clothes that they truly want to wear. The core inspiration for their products stems from the customers themselves–taking all of their needs into consideration while adapting to the ever-changing image of today’s apparel.

 

38982_flBurnside is starting off this season with a bang, offering the perfect mix of sunny-day fits and spring gear that’s ready to take on the chilly days too! Check out a sampling of what this brand has to offer:

The Burnside B9371 Camo-Diamond Boardshort puts a trendy spin on a classic style. The CAMO trend is hotter than ever! These authentic board shorts come in black camo or green camo, and are made with attention to detail. They’re lightweight and comfortable with a drawstring closure, spandex fly and an inset front patch pocket on the thigh.

 

 

Logos look great on plaid shirts like the B9202 3317_flplaid button-up and the B8210 super soft flannel (click on picture for the product page). It’s a comfortable and trendy staple that’s great as a uniform shirt for a bar, grill or restaurant. The flannel is lightweight, breathable and soft. It has two chest pockets with button-down flaps, a half back yoke and adjustable cuffs. The B9202 button up is a cotton/poly blend, which has a great feel and fit. It’s also available with long sleeves. Burnside also offers solid button down shirts, like the B9259 Stretch-Stripe Short Sleeve and the B9265 Dobby-Stripe–perfect for dressing up or dressing down.

The B8127 Yarn-Dyed Raglan is a t-shirt with the look of fleece. The striped sleeves set this hoodie apart from other lightweight pullover styles,-offering the ultimate in casual style and comfort. It’s made of 4.9 oz cotton/poly jersey and is the perfect grab-n-go pullover for the spring and summer months.

3322_flThe B8701 faux-vest offers the layered look with ease and practicality. It’s a nylon vest with fleece sleeves and a hood. The lining is camo, which adds a nice pop of contrast to the colorblocked appearance. This piece looks great embellished with a logo, and men love to wear this style! It’s perfect for those chilly, rainy days when you need just the right amount of protection from the elements.

With their roots dug deep into the retail market for over 15 years, Burnside is one of the most trusted and reliable brands in the wholesale sector for appropriately-priced wovens, bottoms, outerwear and knits. Available for retail sale at industry giants like JC Penny and Sears, they have gained a following and continue to make a splash in the wholesale sector. Checkout Blankstyle’s full selection of Burnside clothing!

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Sublimation Apparel Printing: The Basics

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Sublimation Apparel printing:

Just when think you’ve covered all your printing bases — screenprinting, DTG — someone asks you about sublimation apparel printing. You might not know what it’s called, but you can’t walk into a retailer without seeing an example of it. It’s a printing method that provides all-over coverage, in full-color.

In a nutshell, sublimation printing uses heat to transfer the dyes onto the fabrics. There are two ways to do this: one is to print onto a transfer paper and then transfer the image to the fabric using heat and pressure. The second involves printing the image directly onto the fabric. But either way, you’re looking at transferring the dyes into the polyester molecules using a combination of time, temper

ature and pressure. With dye sublimation, the result is a virtually permanent full-color high-resolution print that won’t crack, fade or peel under normal conditions. If you’re looking for color saturation, you’re looking for dye sublimation printing.

Unlike screen printing, where one color is added at a time, with sublimation printing, all colors are printed at the same time so there’s not a risk of the colors not lining up or running. And as we may have mentioned, sublimation printing is the only way to go, if you’re trying to get that all-over printed look.

Image above: Epson SureColor® F6070

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Offset vs. Digital Sublimation Printing

There are two types of sublimation apparel printing: Offset and Digital. The differences between the two can be simplified to a single word: volume. Offset sublimation requires a pretty hefty investment – the machinery alone can cost up to $1 million and you’re looking to do print runs of between 5,000 – 10,000. So if you don’t have a cool million hanging around, and you’re hoping for print run under 500 pieces, then you’re looking at digital sublimation, which will give the saturated all-over print look, without having to invest quite as much capital.

Image above: from Epson’s Digital Sublimation fashion show

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Direct to Garment Printing (DTG) vs Sublimation

While both DTG and digital sublimation use inkjet printer technology, the processes and results are quite different. The first big difference you’ll notice between DTG and sublimation is going to be your garment choice. DTG is the choice for 100% cotton fabrics, while Sublimation only works on polyester garments (sublimation needs a polymer-based surface). Both processes will work on blended fabrics, but the result will be a little washed out and faded.

But that’s only the beginning. The entire chemistry behind the two processes is different. I’ll spare you the Chem 101, but basically, the DTG process is relying on surface adhesion, while with sublimation, there is actual molecular bonding taking

place. (The dye actually begins as a gas before becoming a solid!)

Image above: The District® Young Mens Sublimate Tee is soft, lightweight and is quite literally, made for sublimation.

 

Sublimation Printing Perks

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  • You can print a highly detailed photographic image on nearly any polyester fabric.
  • You can print on textiles prior to the assembly of the garment for all-over coverage
  • Many polyester fabrics provide moisture-wicking capabilities making your garment perfect for high-performance sports ware.
  • There is no feel, which makes for a soft hand.
  • Perfect for full-color design on light textiles
  • Extensive color options

Sublimation Printing Downsides

  • You have to print on light color polyester – cotton need not apply
  • It can be a little more expensive than other printing options.

Image above: Alo™ M1006 Performance T-shirt’s moisture wicking shirt with an antimicrobial treatment that keeps clothes odor free, is perfect for sublimation printing.

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When you’re ready to take a leap into the world of sublimation apparel printing, check out our sublimation apparel category. If you don’t see what you are looking for, let us know. And we’ll help you get started on your sublimation journey!

Image above: The District® Juniors Sublimate Tee® is perfect for sublimation apparel printing

Cotton Heritage: A Lesson in Entrepreneurship

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Some people seem to have entrepreneurship in their blood. Neeraj “Mickey” Sachdeva, CEO and founder of Cotton Heritage came by both his entrepreneurial sense and his understanding of textiles honestly.

The Sachdeva family has a strong tradition of working with textiles. Mickey was actually raised in a city, which is considered to be the capital of the knitwear garment industry in North India. And the family business, Roochi Traders, a leading distributor of sportswear and active wear, was founded by Mickey’s father, Vishwa Sachdeva, back in 1982, the year that the Sachdeva family came to the United States.

In a true immigrant success story, Vishwa landed in the US with only $25 in his pocket, and looked to textiles to help provide a living for the family. He started importing fabrics from Japan with the help of some relatives. Then in 1986, when the Japanese yen turned strong, and it was no longer profitable to import from Japan, Vishwa began selling garments to Indian shops in the Los Angeles area. It was a true family business. Mickey’s mother, Prem, would sew from 6 AM to midnight every day, making the clothes that Vishwa would later sell.  Both Mickey and his brother, Vikram (Vik), helped out with the family business when they weren’t busy with schoolwork.

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Mickey was only 14 when the family left India and moved to California, but it didn’t take him long before he jumped straight into American commerce.  First, he took on a newspaper route. Then he got a job washing recreational vehicles. He flipped hamburgers at Wendy’s, and worked as a cashier at Knott’s Berry Farm. He got a job at a General Motors plant and then as a bank teller. He was just a teenager, but Mickey already had had more jobs than most people twice his age. Mickey says that initial work experience was critical to his later success. “It gave me an insight into a lot of different things,” says Mickey. “How to deal with people, how to handle money, how businesses work.”

By 11th grade, Mickey, was anxious to take the jump from working for others to working for himself and so he began pressuring his father to let him take on a bigger role in the family clothing business. “But my dad, a typically Indian father, wanted me to concentrate on my education first,” says Mickey. “I was very persistent and told him I would bug him every day about it. So Mickey was put to the test.  He was dropped off at the Los Angeles flea market with a box of 24 dozen undergarments and told to sell them. Only seventeen, Mickey wasn’t given any instructions about how to make the sales, but he still managed to sell nearly all of the undergarments in the box, and the experience only whetted his appetite for more.

While enrolling in college, Mickey started selling garments out of the family garage. That small business grew and grew until finally a neighborhood complained about the large trucks showing up to the Sachdeva residence on nearly a daily basis. Instead of being defeated, the push out of the family garage gave Mickey the momentum to move to a real warehouse, an 800-square foot space in Santa Fe Springs, California.

Today, the company is based in a 110,000-square-foot warehouse in the City of Commerce, its
headquarters since 1996. The company also has distribution centers in New York and Miami, for a total of 165,000 square feet of warehouse space. A far cry from that initial start in the family garage.girls

And Cotton Heritage still remains true to the Indian heritage of the Sachdeva family. All the goods are manufactured in South East Asia and in other Eastern garment industry hubs. Because they can speak the language and understand the cultures of these countries, it makes it an easy place for the Cotton Heritage brand to be manufactured. Mickey says that these days, his only goal is to make clothes that he wants to wear. That means, using the best yarns and dyes possible and making sure that quality control is top notch.

This commitment to quality means that Cotton Heritage shirts are considered to be one of the best shirts for direct to garment printing. Mickey says that they achieve this by choosing the right quality yarns, knitting them tightly and then by choosing the right dyes and chemical suppliers and enzyme helps the product to create a flat and good surface for printability. They also use an enzyme wash to keep the clothes extremely soft (The enzyme removes all the impurities from the surface of the fabric and gives it a better appearance, surface, and hand feel.